Heather's Hangout

Sharing the people, places & little moments that make a difference.

Photography exhibit lets you explore the world October 7, 2014

Filed under: Random Travels & Exploring — Heather @ 11:03 pm
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Having fun in an exhibit

Having fun in an exhibit

I love taking pictures. I love capturing moments and memories. I love seeing others’ pictures to view a scene as they do and glimpse their lives. So I was very excited when my husband and I planned a date night that included a visit to Cranbrook Institute of Science in Bloomfield Hills. A new exhibit, Women of Vision: National Geographic Photographers on Assignment, focuses on the amazing work of 11 award-winning female photojournalists from National Geographic.

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It happened that the evening we chose to visit was the first Friday of the month, which meant museum admission is free from 5-10pm. We wandered through the main halls of the institute to explore and play in the exhibits. Unfortunately the outside sky was cloudy and drizzling so we couldn’t look at the stars or planets. The Institute replaced their telescope and upgraded the observatory area last year. The technology involved in the operations is very cool so I highly recommend visiting on a clear evening.

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Down in the lower level, the exhibit, “The Science of Sight, Light and Illusion,” provided some fun interactive items. Several kiosks highlighted techniques used in the entertainment industry to manipulate light and motion (using a green screen caused lots of laughs with Justin and me!). The stations on sight looked at both human and animal eyesight, which was pretty fascinating. Other stations looked at color from the human eye.

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CISJustinpictureThe Women of Vision exhibit is also in the lower level and contains more than 100 images and multimedia from these 11 influential female photojournalists. The photos were taken from around the world, featuring animals, landscape, war, society and life. Each photographer has her own section of the exhibit with a short background on her and top photos.  This was truly a fantastic exhibit. I found myself going back to certain photos to look a bit longer at the details and absorb the impact the photos had on the story trying to be told to viewers. I loved the photos of the African animals and landscapes around the world. I couldn’t pull away from the images of child brides in the Middle East and worn torn Iraq. The images of people in the Arctic fascinated me and the moments of teenage life touched me. Justin and I both agreed this exhibit is very well-done and worth seeing. I’m so happy we checked it out.

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After Cranbrook, we headed to Griffin Claw Brewing Company in Birmingham. The restaurant/brewery opened several months ago but it’s always been packed when we’ve driven by so we hoped it would be less crowded at 10pm. It was still busy but we easily found seats amongst their communal seating (not my favorite type of seating). The decor and ambiance are relaxing and low-key, however, the noise level is fairly loud. I tried a flight of four beers – their wheat beer is very light (for a wheat) and I liked the Screamin’ Pumpkin. Justin tried their Bourbon Barrel Imperial Stout – a little light in flavor. Our next stop (hey it was a Friday!) was at Black Lotus in Clawson. I was at first disappointed they had no wheat beers on tap but I tried their pumpkin ale, which was surprisingly tasty (I say this because I don’t usually like pumpkin). Justin enjoyed their Octoberfest beer. Overall, a very enjoyable date night with my husband. I can’t wait for the next one!

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The Women of Vision exhibit is open through Dec. 30, 2014 and is free with museum admission.

 

End of the year fun plentiful in southeast Michigan December 26, 2013

Filed under: Random Travels & Exploring — Heather @ 5:38 pm
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The Christmas rush is over.

The Christmas rush is over.

Now that the Christmas rush is past, many of you may be taking a deep relaxing breath and wondering what to do for the remainder of the year. Maybe you’re like me and ready to avoid the shopping malls and stores. Maybe you’re looking for activities to keep the kids busy during school break (as if the mounds of toys shouldn’t do this!). Maybe you want to get some friends together for a fun outing. Whatever your reasons, there is plenty to do in the area, both inside and outside.

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Snow has fallen on southeast Michigan, providing opportunities to play outside. Many metroparks, and even some golf courses, have plenty of trails groomed for cross country skiing. We may try snowshoeing this winter. I know REI rents snowshoes (and other outdoor gear), which will be good for us rather than buying before determining if we like the activity.

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If you are interested in warm activities, there is plenty to choose from! Many metroparks also have nature centers filled with interesting animals and exhibits. From past blog posts, you’ve probably noticed I’m a fan of our local cultural institutions – there are many to choose from that offer fun yet educational opportunities for all ages.

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Mastodon lower jaw

Mastodon lower jaw fossil

From now through Dec. 30, Cranbrook Institute of Science is hosting Fossil Festival from 1-4pm (free with museum admission). This hands-on special event lets visitors make a dinosaur egg, create fossil casts and more. The event coincides with the Institute’s traveling exhibit, Dinosaurs: The Lost World. Daily planetarium and bat shows are also available for an additional fee.

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While on the Cranbrook campus, visitors interested in art can head to the Art Museum for their special exhibit, My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process, which is open through March 2014 (free with museum admission). This exhibit focuses on the idea that drawing is a thinking process in arts and sciences, and that sketches on paper are the start of most idea (think car designs, football plays, house layouts and more).

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The Michigan Science Center in Detroit is hosting kids’ lab experiments on Saturday and Sunday (free with museum admission). These hands-on experiments and demonstrations let kids learn to use microscopes and other science gadgets.  The science center has a cool Kids Town for young children to explore and their traveling exhibit, Science of Rock n’ Roll, is open through Dec. 31 (additional fee to tour this exhibit). Visitors can learn about the history of rock and roll, the building blocks of music, discover how instruments work, and more. Several interactive stations welcome visitors to create music, remix famous rock songs, practice on various musical instruments, and more.

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If you’re in Detroit at the Michigan Science Center, you can wander across the street to the Detroit Institute of Arts for the Watch Me Move: The Animation Show that closes Jan. 5, 2014. This exhibit highlights more than 100 classic, popular and cutting-edge animated segments from movies that span across cultures and genres. While the DIA is free to Oakland, Macomb and Wayne county residents, the Watch Me Move exhibit is an extra fee.

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The Detroit Historical Museum is across Woodward and offers free museum admission to visitor interested in taking a step back in time to discover local history and landmarks.

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yarnI’m planning to take advantage of some classes offered at my local Michael’s. I’ve wanted to learn to knit or crochet for a while so decided taking a basic intro class would be better than trying to teach myself. A variety of classes, from knitting to beading to scrapbooking, are offered at a minimal fee. I noticed our local JoAnn’s and the community center also offer classes.

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Local libraries are also offering programs, especially for toddlers and young children. Reading time and special programs are usually abundant so check out your library’s website or calendar (I’ve also noticed most of these programs are not limited to city residents so you can check out other libraries too). Speaking of reading, I just picked up some books from the library and downloaded an e-book from my library app for my Kindle so I guarantee you’ll find me on the couch at times wrapped in a blanket with tea while the snow falls outside. Now that’s pure relaxation for me!

 

A holiday walk through historic Meadow Brook Hall December 17, 2013

Filed under: Random Travels & Exploring — Heather @ 10:29 pm
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Not too shabby!

I love history, love learning about and understanding the past, embracing the road that brought us to our family and society. I may not always love the history as it happened but think it’s an important part of what makes us. So I really enjoyed a recent outing to Holiday Walk at Meadow Brook Hall on Oakland University’s campus in Rochester. The 88,000-square feet (yes, that big) Tudor home was built between 1926-1929 on a 1,500-acre country estate owned by Alfred and Matilda Dodge Wilson.

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Matilda was originally married to John Dodge, one of the founders of Dodge Brothers Motor Car Company. They had three children and lived in Detroit. They bought 320 acres to have as a weekend and summer getaway (Matilda and Alfred later purchased the additional property). John Dodge and his brother contracted Spanish Influenza at an auto show in New York in 1920 and died, leaving her as the wealthiest woman in the U.S. at that time. Their youngest child had died a year earlier. About five years later, Matilda met and married Alfred Wilson, who was successful from his lumber business. They eventually adopted a son and daughter.

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Meadow Brook Hall hosts an annual Holiday Walk event that opens the home for tours through festively decorated rooms. There is a different theme each year so this year was “Treasures of Travel.” This theme put numerous artifacts and treasures, including clothes, toys, furniture and more, on display from the many trips the Dodges, then Wilsons took around the world.

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A cozy fireplace welcomes you

What I found so interesting about this home was that most of the rooms were cozy, warm and welcoming. Some older, large homes can be drafty and more showcase than home (of course some modern, large homes are the same!). Perhaps the Christmas trees and decorations in every room provided the ambiance but I think it’s also the architecture and furnishings. The sun porch was so inviting with three walls of floor to ceiling windows overlooking the grounds and furniture carefully arranged for conversation and relaxing. Despite the snow falling outside, I easily imagined sitting in the room with a book and cup of tea. The library was fantastic, as was Mr. Wilson’s bedroom with the horse pictures and semi-rustic (yet high class!) furnishings. Both Frances and Danny had guest rooms for their friends to stay the night (which made sense as the docent pointed out back then cars didn’t travel as fast from Detroit to Rochester).

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As with most great estate homes from the past, the staircase is grand and awe-inspiring, especially when you get to the top and see a huge ‘lobby’ with enough room to host a small party! In many of the rooms you saw closets or staircases ‘hidden’ behind panel walls that blended perfectly into the room. It made me smile to imagine being a child growing up in the house, sneaking through the house via winding stairways in the wall. How fun!

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A docent (volunteer) was in each room, sharing great facts and history of the family, their travels and the décor in that particular room. For instance, we learned Matilda’s daughter, Frances, became a well-respected horsewoman/breeder in Lexington, and the oldest son, Danny, was killed on his honeymoon at 21 years old after a dynamite explosion (ironically he survived the explosion but on the way to a hospital via boat, he fell overboard and drown.).

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We didn’t get to see all 110 rooms of the home (hoping another tour shows you those areas) so I know the home is way larger and grander than I could imagine right now. But overall I was impressed with the craftsmanship, architecture, décor and history.

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Toy cars on display in Danny's Cabin

Toy cars on display in Danny’s Cabin

A short walk from the hall were Danny’s Cabin and Knole Cottage, Frances’ playhouse. These were both quite the ‘playhouses.’ The original part of the cabin was built in 1926 as a playhouse, then a workshop was added in 1937 for his hobby of working on cars and engines. Frances’ Knole Cottage was built at ¾ scale replica of a real house – back then it was one of the few homes in the area with working plumbing and electrical. It was built to teach her how to manage a household so she even got a checkbook and budget (at 12 years old). We had to bend down to walk through the doorways but I imagine any young child would love it.

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The Wilsons deeded the home and grounds to Michigan State University in 1957, which eventually became Oakland University. Meadow Brook Hall has been well-preserved and cared for over the years by a dedicated team of staff and volunteers. The Christmas decorations are creative, tasteful and fun. I’m so happy we went to this event. It certainly put me in the holiday spirit and we enjoyed the walk through history.

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Holiday Walk continues through Dec. 23 so don’t miss this great event.

 

Hiking through history at Cranbrook November 26, 2013

Filed under: Random Travels & Exploring — Heather @ 4:20 pm
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Bundled up for our hike!

Bundled up for our hike!

By the time November arrives, I usually am retiring my hiking shoes for the year since snow and ice don’t mix well with a titanium femur and knee. I’m pleased that while the cold temps have arrived, the snow and ice are still on the horizon. This gave Justin and me an opportunity to enjoy a hike through one of my favorite campuses this past weekend.

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It was a sunny, dry day when we arrived at Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. Temps were in the high 20s with a brisk wind but we dressed in layers and looked forward to the fresh air as we explored the historic campus.

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I love Cranbrook. It mostly stems from working in the public relations office for almost five years, but even before that I loved how the campus blends science, nature, education and art so seamlessly. If you’re not familiar with the history of the area, here’s a brief overview: Cranbrook was founded by George and Ellen Booth in the early 1900s. George, a steel magistrate, and Ellen, of the Scripps newspaper family, loved art, science and education. They were instrumental in bringing major works of art and architecture to the Detroit area and eventually purchased 174 acres in Bloomfield Hills to build their summer estate (purchasing more acreage as their plans expanded). They worked with renowned architects, including Eliel Saarinen and Albert Kahn, to create their manor home and later key buildings, such as Brookside (elementary), Kingswood (girls) and Cranbrook (boys) Schools, the Institute of Science, Art Museum and Academy.

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Trails surrounding the gardens.

While I especially love driving through campus during spring and fall, it really is beautiful throughout the entire year. Deer are often spotted, and this particular day we saw ducks, swans, geese and many squirrels. The campus appeared almost devoid of people (most likely from the brisk temps!), although many cars filled the Institute of Science parking lot. Those were smart (inside a warm building!) people exploring Dinosaurs – The Lost World exhibit (see my previous blog to know how great that is), visiting the Bat Zone or being adventurous in a planetarium show. We parked near the science museum, then cut down a trail by the stegosaurus. The Institute of Science hosts a very popular annual Maple Syrup Festival in the spring so I am very familiar with the trails and trees near that area.

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The campus balances the public venues, such as the science and art museums, with the private schools so one has to be thoughtful (and knowledgeable) in where you should follow the trails. The one past the stegosaurus leads down to the facilities used during Maple Syrup Festival or along the side of the new girls’ middle school toward Kingswood Lake.

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As we walked along the lake, I was pleased to have some facts and stories return from the depths of my memories. Justin kept me on my toes with questions, although I finally admitted my history of the campus had weakened in the many years since I worked there. My excuse was I primarily worked at the Institute of Science so my knowledge was much stronger in that area! I still love the Institute, love visiting and love catching up with former coworkers. It still ranks as my favorite place to work. As you walk along the lake, beautiful Cranbrook House comes into view. I recalled some days walking from the Institute to Cranbrook House for PR department meetings. The fresh air and quiet walk always cleared my mind and often brought new ideas or eroded writer’s block.

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Cranbrook House - pretty even in the cold.

Cranbrook House – pretty even in the cold.

Cranbrook House is one of metro Detroit’s oldest surviving historic manors. The Arts and Craft style home was designed by Albert Kahn in 1908. The upper floors are currently used as administrative offices, while the main floor is preserved to show the amazing architecture, tapestries, art and more. During the summer, the 40-acre gardens surrounding the historic home flourish with bright colors and lush greenery, sculptures, and running fountains. Even without the blooms, it was fun to walk through the gardens. There are many sculptures to be found when wandering, and we marveled at the views the Booth family and their guests had when the house was lived in. All of course show signs of aging but a good job has been done to preserve the pieces as much as possible (however, Mother Nature can be tough at times).

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We cut toward the amphitheater, laughing about being on stage, then found a trail that took us near the Art Museum and Academy. Justin has never been to either so we walked along the buildings to view the Orpheus Fountain and Saarinen House (the Art Deco house was designed by Finnish-American designer Eliel Saarinen in the late 1920s).

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There are several great tours available to the public interested in learning more about this unique gem. Tours of Saarinen House are offered May-October; the Art Museum offers several tours through the collections, and a self-guided tour of the campus sculptures; the House and Gardens tours have both guided and self-guided tours; and other special tours are available throughout the campus.

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Despite the cold temps, we stayed warm in our layers and had a very enjoyable day. I was happy to explore the campus with Justin, letting him see why I loved driving into work throughout the year. And if the temps are too cold for wandering outside, there is plenty of do inside the warm buildings of the Institute of Science, Art Museum and Cranbrook House.

 

Activities to make sure you enjoy the holidays November 15, 2013

Filed under: Random Travels & Exploring — Heather @ 5:40 pm
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tree_1 I’m not quite ready for the holiday season and cold weather, but I do love the events and activities surrounding the holidays. Metro Detroit comes alive with music, lights and cheer. While the days quickly fill with parties and gatherings with family and friends, I try to fit some community festivities into the calendar too. These are some of the many events and activities occurring during the holiday season:

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Holiday Walk, Nov. 29-Dec. 23 – This tour lets guests visit the 88,000 square feet, 110-room country estate of Matilda Dodge Wilson and her family. Meadow Brook Hall, built between 1926 and1929, has been carefully maintained with original family furnishings and art. During the holidays it is decorated beautifully throughout and daily tours let you step back in time. Danny’s Cabin features vintage toys. Other events occurring during the holidays include breakfast or supper with Santa, and Holiday High Tea in December. (fee)

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 Noel Night, Dec. 7 – This annual event includes more than 70 venues in midtown Detroit, including the Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit Historical Museum, Michigan Science Center and more, that open their doors for free admission from 5-10pm. There are tons of activities to do, music, dance groups and more. (free, unless you buy food, drinks, etc).

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dino_1Giving Thanks for Dinosaurs, Nov. 29-Dec. 1 – Cranbrook Institute of Science hosts a family-friendly event from 1-4pm on the weekend after Thanksgiving. Guests can tour Dinosaurs – The Lost World exhibit and check out exploration stations and special activities. On Saturday, Nov. 30, guests can help clean dinosaur bones. Daily planetarium shows and the bat programs are also available. (fee)

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Holiday Nights in Greenfield Village, weekends in December – My favorite historic ‘village’ comes alive during the holiday season with live entertainment throughout the streets, candlelit paths, gorgeous Christmas displays, holiday shops, ice skating, live reindeer and, of course, Santa. This event often sells out so don’t wait to reserve tickets. (fee)

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Plays and musicals – There are some great plays that are standard for the season. My favorite: Meadow Brook Theater hosts a great rendition of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, which runs Nov. 15-Dec. 22. I saw this play at Meadow Brook a few years ago and loved it. The stage, costumes and acting were superb. (fee)

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Holidays in Henry Ford Museum, Nov. 29-Jan. 5 – If you want to stay warm indoors, visit Henry Ford Museum to explore a winter wonderland that includes a giant Christmas tree, story time, train displays and Santa. (fee)

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Nutcracker Tea, Winter Wonderland & Candlelight Stroll, various December dates – The Edsel and Eleanor Ford House welcomes guests to several holiday events throughout December. The Candlelight Stroll lets guests view Christmas trees, ornaments and other trimmings in this grand estate that was home to one of America’s most prominent families. The Nutcracker Tea welcomes families to enjoy treats, tea and visits with Santa, while Winter Wonderland opens the amazing grounds for exploration and a fun time around a fire pit, including songs, stories and hot cocoa. (fee)

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photo(18)Movies – If you’d rather stay warm inside your home, cuddled under a blanket with hot cocoa or chai latte, there are plenty of great Christmas movies to entertain. My favorites include White Christmas with Bing Crosby (reminds me of my dad and grandma), National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Peanuts Christmas, and Frosty the Snow Man.

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There are so many great ways to enjoy the Christmas season, whether at home or in the community. What are some of your favorite activities?

 

Face to face with dinosaurs at Cranbrook August 4, 2013

Filed under: Random Travels & Exploring — Heather @ 6:00 pm
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photo(1)Justin and I took advantage again of Cranbrook Institute of Science’s special free first Friday program. We were happy our friends came with us to explore the natural history and science museum. While we enjoyed wandering the entire institute, our main interest was checking out the new exhibit, Dinosaurs: The Lost World, which opened in June and runs through July 2014. I was very curious to explore the new exhibit, knowing it was developed by the CIS staff and took many hours to come together.

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The dinosaur exhibit fills the entire 6,000 square feet traveling exhibit hall on the lower level of the museum. The dinosaurs on display in the exhibit lived in Wyoming during the last 3 million years of the Cretaceous Period. As mentioned, the CIS staff developed Dinosaurs: The Lost World, in collaboration with Jack and John Hankla, who have gathered one of the world’s most impressive private fossil collections, The Hankla Collection.

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photo(2)When you first enter the Lost World exhibit, look to the left and you’re greeted by a lot of dinosaurs, even some “flying” from the ceiling! It’s a very cool sight. The exhibit boasts more than 60 complete research quality skeleton casts and even some real skeletons. There are several displays of real fossil eggs – some of them are huge! Although when Justin pointed out the size of the dinosaur skeleton, it made sense one of the eggs would need to be that big to produce such a large animal.

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The skeletons are of differing size and in varying phases of motion, highlighting the variety of dinosaurs that once roamed our Earth. I would guess two of the most recognizable dinosaurs in the exhibit are the T. rex and Velociraptor, made most famous by their (digital) appearances in the Jurassic Park movie series. One of the avian (flying) dinosaurs could reach the size of a F-16 fighter jet! We were all amazed at the size of the one that resembled our modern day alligator. This species could grow to 9 tons! The skeleton was in a cool position with the jaw open, ready to bite another dinosaur. We nervously chuckled it would not be fun to encounter something of that size.

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photo(20)Two items stood out to me: A big slab of sandstone contained real fossil bones preserved in storm deposits. How crazy to see all these fossils together, imagining the excitement of coming across this amazing discovery. There is also a slab that has footprints of four dinosaurs and hints of other contemporary animals. It was cool to pick out the various footprints, knowing this cast is a one of the kind in North America.

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There is also a children’s area filled excavation activities. While it was great to see so many children enjoying the mock excavation area, I cringed for the staff who had to clean the fake dirt off the carpet. It was everywhere! We were really pleased to see so many families wandering the museum. The children walking through the dinosaur exhibit were certainly enthralled with the numerous large skeletal casts. Many parents were reading the exhibit signs to their kids, explaining various facts. I always love watching children get excited about arts and culture!

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If you are interested in learning more about paleontology and dinosaurs, check out the CIS program schedule as there will be upcoming “Dino Prep Lab” days when visitors are welcome to help prepare real dinosaur fossils, as well as special lectures by local and visiting geologists and paleontologists.

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photo(21)Throughout the exhibit, and the institute’s other exhibits, visitors will find QR codes on signs. These barcode symbols can be scanned with a special app (usually free to download for smart phones) that then takes visitors to websites or other portals containing extra information on an item or section of the exhibit. A creative approach to further engaging visitors in the exhibit experience.

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After our museum visit, we enjoyed dinner at Moose Preserve in Bloomfield Hills (located a short distance from CIS at Square Lake/Woodward). The food is always good and the drinks cold at this restaurant.

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The first Friday of the month is free at CIS from 5-10pm through June 2014. The Bat Zone and observatory are also free; planetarium shows are an additional charge.

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Note: I served as the PR manager for CIS for about five years; however, I genuinely enjoy visiting the museum and Cranbrook in general so these opinions are my own. 🙂

 

Exploring Grand Rapids Public Museums April 19, 2013

Filed under: Random Travels & Exploring — Heather @ 4:32 pm
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It's a good place any time a horse greets you (real or fake!)

It’s a good place any time a horse greets you (real or fake!)

Justin and I returned to Grand Rapids last weekend for a special beer release at Founders Brewing Co. and to explore a bit more of the downtown. We arrived to a full house at Founders but found a table to share with two random guys who happened to be from metro Detroit too (small world!). After a good lunch and tasty beer, we headed to our next destination: Grand Rapids Public Museum.

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The museum is located at the Van Andel Museum Center, across the street from the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum we visited two weeks ago. I thought the admission fee was affordable – $8 for adults and discounts for children, students ($3) and seniors. Planetarium shows are additional ($3), as are carousel rides ($1) and special exhibits (varies on exhibit). There is a $5 parking fee (structure across the street is convenient).

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This isn’t a very intellectual sounding way to describe a museum but overall I thought the museum was ‘friendly,’ meaning the exhibits at the entrance were colorful and inviting for guests of all ages to read and explore. Past the lobby, you initially walk into a three-story, glass-walled, open floor plan. The museum experience reminded me of a combined Greenfield Village, Cranbrook Institute of Science and Detroit Historical Museum – exhibits that replicate the streets of a historic city; fossils, minerals and other science intermixed throughout the various floors; and model storefronts and other exhibits that

Love our country.

Love our country.

take guests back in time.

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Throughout the museum, you’ll see letters of the alphabet correlating to a specific themed exhibit (F is for fossils, H is hats, U is for USA and so on). Collecting A-Z highlights many unique artifacts. It’s a fun way to engage visitors and encourage exploration of the entire museum.

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The Streets of Old Grand Rapids exhibit lets you wander through a 3/4 scale detailed re-creation of the city in the 1890s. There are 11 shops featuring actual businesses that display real merchandise from that era. While we weren’t alive during that time period, it was interesting to see how different life was then. I’m sure our ancestors would both marvel and cringe at the technology and product advancement.

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Cool space exhibit!

Cool space exhibit!

We didn’t know that Grand Rapids was dubbed “Furniture City” because it was the first place for mass-produced furniture in North America. The exhibit, The Furniture City, displays furniture made from the 1840s – 1990s in Grand Rapids. It also shows a model of a factory, where a volunteer was demonstrating how to make wood furniture parts with real 19th century factory machines. The exhibit was under construction so some areas weren’t completed. It will be the largest museum exhibit when finished. Fun facts to learn!

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There are many other exhibits to see at the museum. The Habitat exhibit takes visitors through several models of environments found in Michigan, as well as displays of numerous animals (none alive!). A special exhibit showcases the impact people in Michigan had on the Civil War, and Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storm and Stories shares stories of survival, heroism, tragedy and discoveries found in the wrecked vessels at

Big mastodon

Big mastodon

the bottom of the Great Lakes. Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition is open at the Grand Rapids Public Museum through July 7, 2013. We didn’t have time to add this to our schedule plus it’s an additional admission fee. It sounds really fascinating.

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We were happy to have the extra time to visit another museum and explore Grand Rapids. It’s a great city and I look forward to heading back someday.

 

 
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